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Championship Productions Featured Items!

older | 1 | .... | 4 | 5 | (Page 6)

    0 0

    with Jay Entlich,
    Columbus State University Women's Head Coach;
    2015 NCAA Division II National Runner-Up, 11 straight NCAA National Tournament Appearances (2006-15),
    4x Peach Belt Conference Coach of the Year; 13x Conference Champs

    Fitness is critical to success in soccer. However, between teaching technique and tactics, it's often difficult to find the time to get athletes into shape. That's where on-the-ball fitness training can be most effective.

    In this video, Jay Entlich presents drills and training progressions that will enable your athletes to build fitness while also developing technique and tactical awareness. Coach Entlich's activities condition players to deal with soccer-specific situations on the basis of what's required in a given match. In a match, players are required to jump and sprint for a particular purpose, such as to create separation from a defender or to clear a ball off the goal line. Entlich provides in-depth explanations on the field to show different ideas on how to disguise fitness and give your players a more productive training session.

    Warm-Up Activities

    During the warm-up segment, Entlich demonstrates five progressions using two players and one ball to help athletes loosen up while building foot skills. One athlete runs and volleys passes back to a server for a minute before switching to serve for recovery. After demonstrating the segment with field players, Entlich shows how the drill can easily be adapted to working with goalkeepers using position-specific drills, such as jumping and catching, to low diving.

    The emphasis in these drills is to get players to develop a foundation of fitness both anaerobically and aerobically based on the distance and time of the events chosen by coaches.

    Small-Sided Games

    In this segment, Entlich uses 3v3 and 4v4 games that can be adapted for a variety of situations to teach transition and improve pace of play while quickly building fitness. Through a series of five games, players are required to quickly recognize opportunities and work hard in attack and recover in order to be successful as a team.

    On the Ball Cool Down Drills

    A well-designed cool down is an important way to close out a practice and help the body recover and prepare for the next session. In the final segment, Entlich demonstrates how you can incorporate ball work into activities like straddle hops, planks, or even push-ups to create competition while keeping contact on the ball even at the end of the practice.

    This video is full of creative ways that progress the "fitness with a ball" concept from warm-ups through cool down. These drills will help you develop a highly-efficient and effective practice that will push your players to perform at their best without having to "run." Perform better later in the game by incorporating these drills from Coach Entlich!

    79 minutes. 2017.


    0 0

    with Frank Kohlenstein,
    Colorado School of Mines Head Men's Coach;
    2015 NCAA Division II South Central Region Coach of the Year - the third time he's won the honor);
    7x RMAC Coach of the Year; 9x RMAC Champions (4 Tournament and 5 Regular Season titles);
    all-time winningest coach in Colorado School of Mines history

    Scoring goals is the most exciting and critical aspect of soccer. The ability to attack quickly and finish requires an aggressive pace and plenty of fitness. In this video, Colorado School of Mines' Frank Kohlenstein showcases three simple drills that do both. By keeping each drill moving and cycling players in and out quickly, he ensures players get enough touches and shooting opportunities to make for a truly effective session. By moving at a faster pace than traditional game speed, players are rewarded for playing at a high intensity, which enables them to enjoy working on their fitness.

    Kohlenstein provides in-depth illustrations both on a white board and on the field to show ideas on how to use the entire team to teach fitness via finishing. You'll learn to set up and teach each drill, while gaining a better understanding of how it can help players quickly improve their endurance and tactical awareness. Kohlenstein explains the teaching points he emphasizes during the games:

    • Movement off the ball to create the spaces needed to be dangerous in the attacking third.
    • Having a sense of urgency in transition is critical in the modern game
    • The technical aspects of finishing in and around the 18 yard box
    • How the use of 1-2 touch, combination play, and speed of play can be vital when going to goal to finish

    3v2, 2v1

    In the 3v2, 2v1 drill, Kohlenstein places a premium on teaching players to exploit defenses and create numerical advantages by counter-attacking quickly. In this series, fitness is achieved through fast offensive and defensive transitions, as well as the continuous pace of play from each restart. To sharpen his players' tactical awareness, Kohlenstein instructs them on how to isolate defenders and create numerical advantages quickly, making it easier to play with pace and score.

    Crossing and Finishing

    This competitive game has plenty of hidden fitness in it and works on finishing from a crossed ball. Kohlenstein teaches players how to frame the goal and bend runs to coordinate their timing, giving the crosser a chance to deliver the perfect pass. In this 4v1 opposed crossing & finishing game, the players must address multiple situations that a team faces in the final third. Finishing, technique, runs in the box, and transitions are just a few areas covered in this dynamic game that incorporates finishing from central and wide areas. This is an excellent exercise for not only your field players getting repetition after repetition, but also works your goalkeepers in a fast-paced, high-tempo drill.

    2v2 Play

    Kohlenstein plays two games of 2v2 simultaneously on the same net. This game creates many opportunities for field players to finish and trains different combinations to break down compact defenses in the final third. In the 2v2 game, players try to attack or counter quickly, creating numerical advantages and better opportunities to score. By playing two games within the same field at the same time, it creates a chaotic environment that forces athletes to communicate and think quickly. Goalies must read the most dangerous situation and react while players must be aware of possession options and when an open goal presents itself for the quick finish.

    No need to block off additional practice time for fitness training! Learn how to incorporate both fitness and finishing in a dynamic, game-like environment courtesy of Coach Kohlenstein.

    69 minutes. 2017.


    0 0

    with Frank Kohlenstein,
    Colorado School of Mines Head Men's Coach;
    2015 NCAA Division II South Central Region Coach of the Year - the third time he's won the honor);
    7x RMAC Coach of the Year; 9x RMAC Champions (4 Tournament and 5 Regular Season titles);
    all-time winningest coach in Colorado School of Mines history

    Good teams can possess the ball, great ones turn possession into a dangerous weapon. Developing a quality possession game requires more than counting consecutive passes - there needs to be a directional objective. In this video, Frank Kohlenstein shows you how to implement drills and games that teach possession with a purpose, giving your team the ability to turn any offensive possession into an opportunity for attack.

    Coach Kohlenstein provides in-depth illustrations on a white board and on the field to show you how to design drills and activities that teach players to maintain possession. He explains the teaching points he emphasizes during the games:

    • The movement and supporting angles needed from supporting players
    • Runs that trigger other runs when moving the ball down the field
    • The runs and gaps that your attacking players needs to make to penetrate

    6v2 E Style

    Adapted from Everton Football Club, Kohlenstein demonstrates a 6v2 drill that places all players in a 12x7 yard box, divided in half by cones. This small sided game lays the basic foundation to his team's ability to keep possession and move the ball with a purpose. Players develop a good sense of rhythm when passing while making sure the angles of support are correct for the ability to "penetrate."

    This drill can be an effective training tool because it teaches players to patiently look for opportunities to play longer passes behind the defenders. In order to enhance the intensity of this drill, Coach Kohlenstein provides three progressions that will challenge your players throughout the session.

    Rado Rondo

    The Rado Rondo is a twist on the traditional rondo. To play with a purpose, Kohlenstein expertly uses target players on each end line and one across a mid-line within the grid to link up with the attacking team. The goal for the attacking team is to pass and move quickly, scoring by passing the ball to the target on the opposite side of the grid. By using the target players to create a numerical advantage, the offensive team can retain possession while looking for open lanes to connect the longer scoring passes.

    This 3v3+3 rondo is not only directional in nature, but functional because it can be adapted based on your system and style of play. The drill teaches players to combine and play off certain players to penetrate. It's during these games that Kohlenstein's focus changes more to the decision-making and supporting angle of the players off the ball.

    8v8+2

    In the third drill, Coach Kohlenstein shows how he develops his teams to have a purpose in possession on a larger scale using this 8v8+2 small sided game. By breaking the field up in three zones, he shows a methodical way of teaching this topic based on where players are on the field. Players try to keep possession of the ball and move through the different thirds of the pitch while trying to score. Throughout the game, Kohlenstein explains the decisions players must think about when in certain thirds.

    Every coach must teach their team how to be dangerous in possession. Coach Kohlenstein shows you ideas for how to train your team to have a purpose when you have possession!

    62 minutes. 2017.


    0 0

    RD-05203A:

    with Frank Kohlenstein,
    Colorado School of Mines Head Men's Coach;
    2015 NCAA Division II South Central Region Coach of the Year - the third time he's won the honor);
    7x RMAC Coach of the Year; 9x RMAC Champions (4 Tournament and 5 Regular Season titles);
    all-time winningest coach in Colorado School of Mines history

    Scoring goals is the most exciting and critical aspect of soccer. The ability to attack quickly and finish requires an aggressive pace and plenty of fitness. In this video, Colorado School of Mines' Frank Kohlenstein showcases three simple drills that do both. By keeping each drill moving and cycling players in and out quickly, he ensures players get enough touches and shooting opportunities to make for a truly effective session. By moving at a faster pace than traditional game speed, players are rewarded for playing at a high intensity, which enables them to enjoy working on their fitness.

    Kohlenstein provides in-depth illustrations both on a white board and on the field to show ideas on how to use the entire team to teach fitness via finishing. You'll learn to set up and teach each drill, while gaining a better understanding of how it can help players quickly improve their endurance and tactical awareness. Kohlenstein explains the teaching points he emphasizes during the games:

    • Movement off the ball to create the spaces needed to be dangerous in the attacking third.
    • Having a sense of urgency in transition is critical in the modern game
    • The technical aspects of finishing in and around the 18 yard box
    • How the use of 1-2 touch, combination play, and speed of play can be vital when going to goal to finish

    3v2, 2v1

    In the 3v2, 2v1 drill, Kohlenstein places a premium on teaching players to exploit defenses and create numerical advantages by counter-attacking quickly. In this series, fitness is achieved through fast offensive and defensive transitions, as well as the continuous pace of play from each restart. To sharpen his players' tactical awareness, Kohlenstein instructs them on how to isolate defenders and create numerical advantages quickly, making it easier to play with pace and score.

    Crossing and Finishing

    This competitive game has plenty of hidden fitness in it and works on finishing from a crossed ball. Kohlenstein teaches players how to frame the goal and bend runs to coordinate their timing, giving the crosser a chance to deliver the perfect pass. In this 4v1 opposed crossing & finishing game, the players must address multiple situations that a team faces in the final third. Finishing, technique, runs in the box, and transitions are just a few areas covered in this dynamic game that incorporates finishing from central and wide areas. This is an excellent exercise for not only your field players getting repetition after repetition, but also works your goalkeepers in a fast-paced, high-tempo drill.

    2v2 Play

    Kohlenstein plays two games of 2v2 simultaneously on the same net. This game creates many opportunities for field players to finish and trains different combinations to break down compact defenses in the final third. In the 2v2 game, players try to attack or counter quickly, creating numerical advantages and better opportunities to score. By playing two games within the same field at the same time, it creates a chaotic environment that forces athletes to communicate and think quickly. Goalies must read the most dangerous situation and react while players must be aware of possession options and when an open goal presents itself for the quick finish.

    No need to block off additional practice time for fitness training! Learn how to incorporate both fitness and finishing in a dynamic, game-like environment courtesy of Coach Kohlenstein.

    69 minutes. 2017.



    RD-05203B:

    with Frank Kohlenstein,
    Colorado School of Mines Head Men's Coach;
    2015 NCAA Division II South Central Region Coach of the Year - the third time he's won the honor);
    7x RMAC Coach of the Year; 9x RMAC Champions (4 Tournament and 5 Regular Season titles);
    all-time winningest coach in Colorado School of Mines history

    Good teams can possess the ball, great ones turn possession into a dangerous weapon. Developing a quality possession game requires more than counting consecutive passes - there needs to be a directional objective. In this video, Frank Kohlenstein shows you how to implement drills and games that teach possession with a purpose, giving your team the ability to turn any offensive possession into an opportunity for attack.

    Coach Kohlenstein provides in-depth illustrations on a white board and on the field to show you how to design drills and activities that teach players to maintain possession. He explains the teaching points he emphasizes during the games:

    • The movement and supporting angles needed from supporting players
    • Runs that trigger other runs when moving the ball down the field
    • The runs and gaps that your attacking players needs to make to penetrate

    6v2 E Style

    Adapted from Everton Football Club, Kohlenstein demonstrates a 6v2 drill that places all players in a 12x7 yard box, divided in half by cones. This small sided game lays the basic foundation to his team's ability to keep possession and move the ball with a purpose. Players develop a good sense of rhythm when passing while making sure the angles of support are correct for the ability to "penetrate."

    This drill can be an effective training tool because it teaches players to patiently look for opportunities to play longer passes behind the defenders. In order to enhance the intensity of this drill, Coach Kohlenstein provides three progressions that will challenge your players throughout the session.

    Rado Rondo

    The Rado Rondo is a twist on the traditional rondo. To play with a purpose, Kohlenstein expertly uses target players on each end line and one across a mid-line within the grid to link up with the attacking team. The goal for the attacking team is to pass and move quickly, scoring by passing the ball to the target on the opposite side of the grid. By using the target players to create a numerical advantage, the offensive team can retain possession while looking for open lanes to connect the longer scoring passes.

    This 3v3+3 rondo is not only directional in nature, but functional because it can be adapted based on your system and style of play. The drill teaches players to combine and play off certain players to penetrate. It's during these games that Kohlenstein's focus changes more to the decision-making and supporting angle of the players off the ball.

    8v8+2

    In the third drill, Coach Kohlenstein shows how he develops his teams to have a purpose in possession on a larger scale using this 8v8+2 small sided game. By breaking the field up in three zones, he shows a methodical way of teaching this topic based on where players are on the field. Players try to keep possession of the ball and move through the different thirds of the pitch while trying to score. Throughout the game, Kohlenstein explains the decisions players must think about when in certain thirds.

    Every coach must teach their team how to be dangerous in possession. Coach Kohlenstein shows you ideas for how to train your team to have a purpose when you have possession!

    62 minutes. 2017.




    0 0

    with Michael Cracas,
    Hiram College Head Women's Soccer Coach;
    former coach at Oberlin College;
    owner of Quick Hands Goalkeeper Training, LLC., USSF National "D" License, NSCAA State (Level 1) & Regional (Level 2) Goalkeeper Diplomas

    In the game of soccer, the goalkeeper has to use their feet and hands to not only deny any threats from the opposition, but to support their team on the field as well.

    In this video, Mike Cracas demonstrates how to put your goalkeeper through a series of drills that deal with situations they'll face throughout a game. Topics include different ways to catch a ball, how to "drop step" as a goalkeeper, agility for goalkeepers, low and high saves, and much more.

    Coach Cracas breaks down this video into six main segments, providing in-depth illustrations to show how to work your goalkeepers to become technically sound and confident when game time comes.

    • Warm-Up Exercises - A series of drills that prepares goalkeepers to deal with not only proper footwork, but hand placement and agility exercises with hurdles and speed ladders in a functional, unopposed setting.
    • Handling Exercises - Includes three types of catching; diamond, basket and high contour catching.
    • "Hoop Series" - Coach Cracas uses two speed rings to force his goalkeepers to get in a set position before using the proper technique to catch the ball. The server varies the service to the goalkeeper, which allows him/her to use the three different handling catches from the previous drills. Cracas also uses "keeper cuffs" to reinforce how and where the hands of the goalkeeper need to be.
    • Reaction Drills - See five progressions and ideas that force goalkeepers to deal with the game-realistic scenarios that will force quick reaction saves.
    • Low Ball and High Ball Saves - Features five progressions and includes important information on footwork. The "drop step" is addressed in order to deal with high ball saves and how to get across the face of the goal for low ball saves on the far post.
    • Warm-up Before a Game Drill Series - "I want my keepers ready for every single possible shot they could face in the first 5 minutes." Cracas presents six ideas featuring everything from agility, high and low saves, shots, and crosses.

    Coach Cracas gives you everything you need to coach your goalkeepers to play with their feet and hands. You will learn the technique, player mindset, body position, and positioning to best manage the space in front of the net.

    84 minutes. 2017.


    0 0

    with Brandon Koons,
    Otterbein University Head Women's Soccer Coach;
    2010 NCAA D-III Final Four; 8x Ohio Athletic Conference regular-season and 5x OAC Tournament Champions;
    5x OAC Coach of the Year; has earned a USSF "B" License and an NSCAA Premier Diploma

    Games at the highest level are won or lost in the midfield third, and coaches are always seeking the upper hand to dominate this key area. Your midfield players must possess the technical skill to be able to expose the spaces in front, behind, and in the flanks of the opposition.

    Brandon Koons demonstrates a series of small-sided games he uses to build exceptional midfield players, which has made his teams an attacking threat en route to 13 conference titles. Coach Koons breaks up this video into six keys games. Within each game, he breaks down and shows numerous progressions that will help your team be dangerous in the midfield.

    Using in-depth illustrations, both on a white board and on the field, Koons explains the teaching points he emphasizes during the exercises:

    • The movement and angles needed from supporting players.
    • Reading the play and making proper decisions based on positioning to find numbers-up situations.
    • What runs trigger other runs to penetrate going forward.
    • The importance of scanning and checking your shoulder for better vision.
    Turning

    Center midfielders need to practice the critical skill of turning, as well as connecting right-to-left and back-to-front. Watch as Coach Koons sets up a series of small sided games that focus on quick ball movement in a small space. These transition games teach players how to defend in a frantic environment as well as how to counterattack quickly when winning the ball. The progressions build these games up from an individual focus to a team focus to drive home the concept.

    Passing and Dribbling

    See how space manipulation within the small-sided games determines the speed and quality of passing and dribbling required for the center midfielder to control the game. These games force players to perform under controlled defensive pressure and be aware of maximizing the space available to play in. The fast and chaotic pace of these transition games forces players to be very aware of how the game develops in order to be successful.

    Awareness

    All of the small sided games presented by Coach Koons are excellent training methods to help develop field awareness. These games involve constant movement within a quick and ever-changing environment. In addition to building on individual skills, these games develop knowing where players are within the game and how they're impacting it. These games tie the technical, tactical, and cognitive skills of the center midfielder together.

    Small Sided Games

    The games presented on this video include:

    • North, South, East, West - The emphasis in this physical and psychologically-demanding game is on developing transition. As the game progresses in numbers, the angles of support are critical to maintain possession and build.
    • End Zone Game - This is where Coach Koons trains players to evaluate the spaces and options given to them by the defenders. It's during this game that Koons stresses which balls to play based on straight or angles runs and how important verbal and non-verbal communication can be in the midfield.
    • Double End Zone Game - Here, Koons teaches players to play off a forward's feet and what runs can be made off of it to be dangerous. He reiterates the importance of the different types of runs his players can make to not only create space for themselves, but also the ability to combine and find third-man runners.
    • The Mourinho Game - In this game, players are always on their toes and ready to not only take advantage of numbers-up situations, but also to delay and defend based on the coach's command. Based on what number the coach calls, certain players have to quickly change which field they are playing on to sprint and quickly assess the situation on the next field of play.
    • Four Goal Game - Coach Koons introduces how to create numbers-up situations with the player on the ball. During the five different progressions in this game, players are able to experience different situations on how to penetrate through playing off a target player, through balls, and the runs coming out of the midfield to create third man runs.

    Through the use of small area games and space manipulation, see how to help your players become effective and efficient at ball movement. Using these competitive transition games from Coach Koons, you'll be able to teach your team how individual skills benefit team play.

    145 minutes. 2017.


    0 0

    with Brandon Koons,
    Otterbein University Head Women's Soccer Coach;
    2010 NCAA D-III Final Four; 8x Ohio Athletic Conference regular-season and 5x OAC Tournament Champions;
    5x OAC Coach of the Year; has earned a USSF "B" License and an NSCAA Premier Diploma

    Midfielders are one of the more important positions in the game and need to constantly support and help their teammates.

    In this video, Brandon Koons shows you how he trains the technical application of individual skills for midfielders to dominate the center of the field. You will learn how important it is to have the correct body shape, timing of runs, proper decision making, and the right attitude to excel.

    Coach Koons breaks up this video into three keys areas. Within each, he breaks down and shows numerous progressions that will help your team be dangerous in the midfield. Coach Koons provides in-depth illustrations both on a white board and on the field to show key technical elements for your players. Coach Koons explains the teaching points he emphasizes during the exercises:

    • The movement and supporting angles needed from supporting players.
    • Reading the play and making the proper decisions based on positioning.
    • Runs that trigger other runs in the midfield third.
    • The importance of scanning and checking your shoulder for better vision.

    Turning

    Koons addresses the ability to turn in a dynamic setting by demonstrating a three-man unopposed passing pattern that lays the foundation to his team's ability to turn and play forward. The emphasis in this drill is on developing a good sense of rhythm when passing and making sure the angles of support are correct. He progresses by adding additional ways to be able to turn and face up the opposition.

    Watch as Coach Koons walks his team through dealing with overweighted passes and how the center middies take pace off the ball to make a successful turn and pass. Conversely, see how to deal with an underweighted pass. The benefits of proper body positioning and an awareness of the playing environment are also discussed.

    Passing and Dribbling

    Koons walks through a series of passing and dribbling progressions that encourage good on-ball and off-ball movement. Throughout the progressions, he encourages ball movement through an emphasis on creativity, which is supported by communication, touch quality, an understanding of run shape, and an awareness of game space.

    Overlapping

    Learn a great progression to work on tight overlapping runs and how the center midfielder moves and interacts within a confined area. See how Koons teaches his players the different types of runs they can make to not only create space for themselves, but also the ability to combine and find third man runners. Throughout the unopposed exercises, he continues to stress how important off the ball movement can be to rip even the most compact defenses apart in a competitive environment.

    The overlapping drills build on the prior drills in this video and are a good way to tie the session together.

    Although designed for the center midfielder, these drills will benefit players of any position, including goalies. Koons does a great job detailing the drills on a whiteboard and then taking it to the field. Every coach must teach their team how to skillfully play through the midfield, and Coach Koons gives you the tools to do just that - and more!

    126 minutes. 2017.


    0 0

    RD-05289A:

    with Brandon Koons,
    Otterbein University Head Women's Soccer Coach;
    2010 NCAA D-III Final Four; 8x Ohio Athletic Conference regular-season and 5x OAC Tournament Champions;
    5x OAC Coach of the Year; has earned a USSF "B" License and an NSCAA Premier Diploma

    Midfielders are one of the more important positions in the game and need to constantly support and help their teammates.

    In this video, Brandon Koons shows you how he trains the technical application of individual skills for midfielders to dominate the center of the field. You will learn how important it is to have the correct body shape, timing of runs, proper decision making, and the right attitude to excel.

    Coach Koons breaks up this video into three keys areas. Within each, he breaks down and shows numerous progressions that will help your team be dangerous in the midfield. Coach Koons provides in-depth illustrations both on a white board and on the field to show key technical elements for your players. Coach Koons explains the teaching points he emphasizes during the exercises:

    • The movement and supporting angles needed from supporting players.
    • Reading the play and making the proper decisions based on positioning.
    • Runs that trigger other runs in the midfield third.
    • The importance of scanning and checking your shoulder for better vision.

    Turning

    Koons addresses the ability to turn in a dynamic setting by demonstrating a three-man unopposed passing pattern that lays the foundation to his team's ability to turn and play forward. The emphasis in this drill is on developing a good sense of rhythm when passing and making sure the angles of support are correct. He progresses by adding additional ways to be able to turn and face up the opposition.

    Watch as Coach Koons walks his team through dealing with overweighted passes and how the center middies take pace off the ball to make a successful turn and pass. Conversely, see how to deal with an underweighted pass. The benefits of proper body positioning and an awareness of the playing environment are also discussed.

    Passing and Dribbling

    Koons walks through a series of passing and dribbling progressions that encourage good on-ball and off-ball movement. Throughout the progressions, he encourages ball movement through an emphasis on creativity, which is supported by communication, touch quality, an understanding of run shape, and an awareness of game space.

    Overlapping

    Learn a great progression to work on tight overlapping runs and how the center midfielder moves and interacts within a confined area. See how Koons teaches his players the different types of runs they can make to not only create space for themselves, but also the ability to combine and find third man runners. Throughout the unopposed exercises, he continues to stress how important off the ball movement can be to rip even the most compact defenses apart in a competitive environment.

    The overlapping drills build on the prior drills in this video and are a good way to tie the session together.

    Although designed for the center midfielder, these drills will benefit players of any position, including goalies. Koons does a great job detailing the drills on a whiteboard and then taking it to the field. Every coach must teach their team how to skillfully play through the midfield, and Coach Koons gives you the tools to do just that - and more!

    126 minutes. 2017.



    RD-05289B:

    with Brandon Koons,
    Otterbein University Head Women's Soccer Coach;
    2010 NCAA D-III Final Four; 8x Ohio Athletic Conference regular-season and 5x OAC Tournament Champions;
    5x OAC Coach of the Year; has earned a USSF "B" License and an NSCAA Premier Diploma

    Games at the highest level are won or lost in the midfield third, and coaches are always seeking the upper hand to dominate this key area. Your midfield players must possess the technical skill to be able to expose the spaces in front, behind, and in the flanks of the opposition.

    Brandon Koons demonstrates a series of small-sided games he uses to build exceptional midfield players, which has made his teams an attacking threat en route to 13 conference titles. Coach Koons breaks up this video into six keys games. Within each game, he breaks down and shows numerous progressions that will help your team be dangerous in the midfield.

    Using in-depth illustrations, both on a white board and on the field, Koons explains the teaching points he emphasizes during the exercises:

    • The movement and angles needed from supporting players.
    • Reading the play and making proper decisions based on positioning to find numbers-up situations.
    • What runs trigger other runs to penetrate going forward.
    • The importance of scanning and checking your shoulder for better vision.
    Turning

    Center midfielders need to practice the critical skill of turning, as well as connecting right-to-left and back-to-front. Watch as Coach Koons sets up a series of small sided games that focus on quick ball movement in a small space. These transition games teach players how to defend in a frantic environment as well as how to counterattack quickly when winning the ball. The progressions build these games up from an individual focus to a team focus to drive home the concept.

    Passing and Dribbling

    See how space manipulation within the small-sided games determines the speed and quality of passing and dribbling required for the center midfielder to control the game. These games force players to perform under controlled defensive pressure and be aware of maximizing the space available to play in. The fast and chaotic pace of these transition games forces players to be very aware of how the game develops in order to be successful.

    Awareness

    All of the small sided games presented by Coach Koons are excellent training methods to help develop field awareness. These games involve constant movement within a quick and ever-changing environment. In addition to building on individual skills, these games develop knowing where players are within the game and how they're impacting it. These games tie the technical, tactical, and cognitive skills of the center midfielder together.

    Small Sided Games

    The games presented on this video include:

    • North, South, East, West - The emphasis in this physical and psychologically-demanding game is on developing transition. As the game progresses in numbers, the angles of support are critical to maintain possession and build.
    • End Zone Game - This is where Coach Koons trains players to evaluate the spaces and options given to them by the defenders. It's during this game that Koons stresses which balls to play based on straight or angles runs and how important verbal and non-verbal communication can be in the midfield.
    • Double End Zone Game - Here, Koons teaches players to play off a forward's feet and what runs can be made off of it to be dangerous. He reiterates the importance of the different types of runs his players can make to not only create space for themselves, but also the ability to combine and find third-man runners.
    • The Mourinho Game - In this game, players are always on their toes and ready to not only take advantage of numbers-up situations, but also to delay and defend based on the coach's command. Based on what number the coach calls, certain players have to quickly change which field they are playing on to sprint and quickly assess the situation on the next field of play.
    • Four Goal Game - Coach Koons introduces how to create numbers-up situations with the player on the ball. During the five different progressions in this game, players are able to experience different situations on how to penetrate through playing off a target player, through balls, and the runs coming out of the midfield to create third man runs.

    Through the use of small area games and space manipulation, see how to help your players become effective and efficient at ball movement. Using these competitive transition games from Coach Koons, you'll be able to teach your team how individual skills benefit team play.

    145 minutes. 2017.




    0 0

    with Matt Clepper,
    Indy Warriors FC Head Coach;
    5x CICC Champions; 4x State Champions; WCSSF U19 League Champions

    The hardest thing to do in the game of soccer - and the most vital aspect that determines the success of your team - is finishing.

    In his five-year tenure with the Indy Warriors, Matt Clepper's teams average four goals or more per match - a total that is incredibly difficult to overcome and has powered the team to three IHSA State Championships in its brief history.

    Coach Clepper demonstrates how he teaches finishing at Indy Warriors FC and what has made his team an attacking threat at the high school level. He provides in-depth illustrations both on a white board and on the field to show different ideas on how to create an attack that will put fear in your opponents. You will learn the correct technique of finishing in terms of placement vs. power, proper runs that need to be made in the box when attacking the goal, how to incorporate the whole team and not just the forwards/strikers, and how the use of combination play and speed of play can help you gain an extra advantage when finishing.

    Create a Philosophy of Attack

    To help your team improve its attacking prowess, it is important to develop an attacking strategy that matches your team's individual strengths. Clepper starts in the classroom and maps out the key elements that make it difficult for your opponents to defend you while highlighting some useful and easy to remember principles of his attacking philosophy.ÿSome of the topics covered include:

    • Where forwards should position themselves to become incredibly hard for the opposition to defend.
    • How to take advantage of the other team's weaknesses.
    • How to create your best angles for attack.

    Once attacking strategies have been created and player positions are identified, Clepper demonstrates how to design movement strategies that enable players to make tactical runs on and off the ball that can unbalance defenses to score more goals.

    Wing Play

    Clepper teaches a few different attacking options from the wing position. The drills and games included in this video follow a progressive training sequence that will help you learn the secrets to building a dangerous attack from the wing.ÿ

    You'll see the 3v0 Wing drill, a crossing and finishing exercise that works on a wing player's angle of approach to the goal and getting to the touch line to create goal scoring opportunities. The emphasis in this drill is that the players develop a good sense of dribbling the ball with pace from wide areas. This includes cutting the ball back, early crosses, and the types of runs needed from your strikers. Once players start developing confidence, defenders are added for more game-like pressure. Clepper progresses the exercise in a more functional setting with passive pressure allowing the players lots of repetition.

    Still under the principle of wing play, Clepper introduces what is known as "probe dribbling." This is where the dribbler actively looks for gaps and spaces for a through ball. He starts this with a 4v4 game where the ball starts from the winger and dribbles around the top of the 18 yard box looking for runs from their supporting attackers to make in key areas. The exercise is progressed in a 6v4 game to add more supporting angles for the attacking team. Finally, Clepper moves to a 6v6 version of the game.

    Checking Forward

    In this segment, Coach Clepper shows the importance of the center forward with their movement and decision making on and off the ball. In a pattern play scenario, Clepper has his players in a 7v4 situation using half the field. During these patterns, players are given plenty of repetition at not only wing play, but also probe dribbling. Some key coaching points include:

    • The cues to look for to create a 1-2 or overlapping moment.
    • How the #10 can create space to get the ball.
    • Movement and decisions to make depending on pressure.

    Press and Switch

    Clepper sets up how to get your forwards to press to create more goal scoring opportunities. It's during this moment where players are taught to try and switch the point of attack to create a 1v1 on the opposite side to exploit the weak side. Players are placed in 5v6 situation, forcing athletes to not only get their head for the switch, but to maintain proper attacking shape and attack with pace once the ball is switched. To make this pressing situation work, Clepper breaks down three drills that isolate the center halfbacks.

    • Halfback Turn Drill - A simple passing drill that works on timing runs, receiving, and turning of the ball.
    • Halfback 2v1 - Works on movement of halfbacks in midfield to create space and then quickly and accurately send it to your wing player. The wing goes 1v1 and has to get a cross off to the other forwards.
    • Halfback Pattern - A pattern is set up so halfbacks can work on quickly and decisively connecting passes with dangerous wing players.

    Clepper finishes by showing how everything applies during a team scrimmage. He constantly emphasizes what his team's attacking identity is and uses a game situation to make sure the attackers are on the same page.

    Similar to his video on team defending, Clepper expertly details strategies to help teams at any level create a devastatingly effective attacking philosophy. This video is full of tactical discussions and on-field practice clips that will show you exactly how to bring these strategies to life on the field.

    75 minutes. 2018.


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    with Matt Clepper,
    Indy Warriors FC Head Coach;
    5x CICC Champions; 4x State Champions; WCSSF U19 League Champions

    The best teams in the world are well organized defensively and make it tough for other teams to play through. Top level teams like Atletico Madrid, the Italian National Team and Inter Milan (under Jose Mourinho) were known for their success because of the way they defended.

    In this video, Coach Clepper demonstrates how he teaches defending at Indy Warriors FC and what has made his team set records for goals against. Clepper teaches four different concepts that will help your team not only defend, but also transition quickly and get organized behind the ball. Clepper provides in-depth illustrations both on a white board and on the field to show different ideas on how to transition quickly on both sides of the ball.

    Filling and Collapsing Space

    The easiest way to break down an opposing defense is to take advantages of gaps between the forwards, midfielders, and defenders. As these gaps are created, alignments must shift to stop the ball, leading to mismatches and goals. Clepper starts in the classroom and maps out the key elements that make it incredibly difficult for your opponents to score while highlighting some useful and easy to remember principles of his defensive philosophy. Some of the topics covered include:

    • Defensive cues to read the game to get a head start on your attacker.
    • The keys to not get beaten in transition.
    • How your defensive strategy should change as play gets closer to the goal your team is defending.
    • How to separate the attacker from the ball on the turn.
    • The proper shape, distances, and angles needed to defend in small groups.
    • How to defend properly to quickly start a counter attack.

    Defending Drills

    Coach Clepper teaches his philosophy about how to be a great individual and team defender. The drills and games included in this video follow a progressive training sequence that will help you learn the secrets to building a great defense.ÿDrills include:

    • 1v1 Facing an Attacker: Learn the three step process for shutting down attackers.
    • 1v1 Facing an Attacker's Back: Learn the key elements of how to quickly dispossess the ball from an attacker who receives it with their back to you.
    • 2v2: Learn the right spacing and movement so your players don't get split. ÿ
    • 4v4 Backline Walkthrough: Coach Clepper walks through the defensive responsibilities checklist.ÿThe series progresses into a live drill where the back four work together to stop the attack in various parts of the field. ÿ
    • 6v4: Learn how to defend and stifle the opponent's attack even when outnumbered. ÿ
    • 8v4: Learn how four defenders can keep eight players from scoring by being in the correct positions.ÿ

    The key coaching points in each drill include:

    • How to make adjustments as the ball moves across the field.
    • Keeping players organized and connected in order to stop through ball penetration.
    • How defensive spacing changes when you are defending a good dribbler.
    • The back four zonal shape and responsibilities when defending outside of the 18 yard box.
    • How to switch from zonal defending to man marking once the ball is inside the 18 yard box.

    Coach Clepper constantly emphasizes the principle of staying connected to eliminate through balls. ÿ

    On average, there are over 200 transitional moments during a game. It's important to master and take advantage of those moments to be successful, and this video will help you do just that!

    77 minutes. 2018.


    0 0

    RD-05319A:

    with Matt Clepper,
    Indy Warriors FC Head Coach;
    5x CICC Champions; 4x State Champions; WCSSF U19 League Champions

    The hardest thing to do in the game of soccer - and the most vital aspect that determines the success of your team - is finishing.

    In his five-year tenure with the Indy Warriors, Matt Clepper's teams average four goals or more per match - a total that is incredibly difficult to overcome and has powered the team to three IHSA State Championships in its brief history.

    Coach Clepper demonstrates how he teaches finishing at Indy Warriors FC and what has made his team an attacking threat at the high school level. He provides in-depth illustrations both on a white board and on the field to show different ideas on how to create an attack that will put fear in your opponents. You will learn the correct technique of finishing in terms of placement vs. power, proper runs that need to be made in the box when attacking the goal, how to incorporate the whole team and not just the forwards/strikers, and how the use of combination play and speed of play can help you gain an extra advantage when finishing.

    Create a Philosophy of Attack

    To help your team improve its attacking prowess, it is important to develop an attacking strategy that matches your team's individual strengths. Clepper starts in the classroom and maps out the key elements that make it difficult for your opponents to defend you while highlighting some useful and easy to remember principles of his attacking philosophy.ÿSome of the topics covered include:

    • Where forwards should position themselves to become incredibly hard for the opposition to defend.
    • How to take advantage of the other team's weaknesses.
    • How to create your best angles for attack.

    Once attacking strategies have been created and player positions are identified, Clepper demonstrates how to design movement strategies that enable players to make tactical runs on and off the ball that can unbalance defenses to score more goals.

    Wing Play

    Clepper teaches a few different attacking options from the wing position. The drills and games included in this video follow a progressive training sequence that will help you learn the secrets to building a dangerous attack from the wing.ÿ

    You'll see the 3v0 Wing drill, a crossing and finishing exercise that works on a wing player's angle of approach to the goal and getting to the touch line to create goal scoring opportunities. The emphasis in this drill is that the players develop a good sense of dribbling the ball with pace from wide areas. This includes cutting the ball back, early crosses, and the types of runs needed from your strikers. Once players start developing confidence, defenders are added for more game-like pressure. Clepper progresses the exercise in a more functional setting with passive pressure allowing the players lots of repetition.

    Still under the principle of wing play, Clepper introduces what is known as "probe dribbling." This is where the dribbler actively looks for gaps and spaces for a through ball. He starts this with a 4v4 game where the ball starts from the winger and dribbles around the top of the 18 yard box looking for runs from their supporting attackers to make in key areas. The exercise is progressed in a 6v4 game to add more supporting angles for the attacking team. Finally, Clepper moves to a 6v6 version of the game.

    Checking Forward

    In this segment, Coach Clepper shows the importance of the center forward with their movement and decision making on and off the ball. In a pattern play scenario, Clepper has his players in a 7v4 situation using half the field. During these patterns, players are given plenty of repetition at not only wing play, but also probe dribbling. Some key coaching points include:

    • The cues to look for to create a 1-2 or overlapping moment.
    • How the #10 can create space to get the ball.
    • Movement and decisions to make depending on pressure.

    Press and Switch

    Clepper sets up how to get your forwards to press to create more goal scoring opportunities. It's during this moment where players are taught to try and switch the point of attack to create a 1v1 on the opposite side to exploit the weak side. Players are placed in 5v6 situation, forcing athletes to not only get their head for the switch, but to maintain proper attacking shape and attack with pace once the ball is switched. To make this pressing situation work, Clepper breaks down three drills that isolate the center halfbacks.

    • Halfback Turn Drill - A simple passing drill that works on timing runs, receiving, and turning of the ball.
    • Halfback 2v1 - Works on movement of halfbacks in midfield to create space and then quickly and accurately send it to your wing player. The wing goes 1v1 and has to get a cross off to the other forwards.
    • Halfback Pattern - A pattern is set up so halfbacks can work on quickly and decisively connecting passes with dangerous wing players.

    Clepper finishes by showing how everything applies during a team scrimmage. He constantly emphasizes what his team's attacking identity is and uses a game situation to make sure the attackers are on the same page.

    Similar to his video on team defending, Clepper expertly details strategies to help teams at any level create a devastatingly effective attacking philosophy. This video is full of tactical discussions and on-field practice clips that will show you exactly how to bring these strategies to life on the field.

    75 minutes. 2018.



    RD-05319B:

    with Matt Clepper,
    Indy Warriors FC Head Coach;
    5x CICC Champions; 4x State Champions; WCSSF U19 League Champions

    The best teams in the world are well organized defensively and make it tough for other teams to play through. Top level teams like Atletico Madrid, the Italian National Team and Inter Milan (under Jose Mourinho) were known for their success because of the way they defended.

    In this video, Coach Clepper demonstrates how he teaches defending at Indy Warriors FC and what has made his team set records for goals against. Clepper teaches four different concepts that will help your team not only defend, but also transition quickly and get organized behind the ball. Clepper provides in-depth illustrations both on a white board and on the field to show different ideas on how to transition quickly on both sides of the ball.

    Filling and Collapsing Space

    The easiest way to break down an opposing defense is to take advantages of gaps between the forwards, midfielders, and defenders. As these gaps are created, alignments must shift to stop the ball, leading to mismatches and goals. Clepper starts in the classroom and maps out the key elements that make it incredibly difficult for your opponents to score while highlighting some useful and easy to remember principles of his defensive philosophy. Some of the topics covered include:

    • Defensive cues to read the game to get a head start on your attacker.
    • The keys to not get beaten in transition.
    • How your defensive strategy should change as play gets closer to the goal your team is defending.
    • How to separate the attacker from the ball on the turn.
    • The proper shape, distances, and angles needed to defend in small groups.
    • How to defend properly to quickly start a counter attack.

    Defending Drills

    Coach Clepper teaches his philosophy about how to be a great individual and team defender. The drills and games included in this video follow a progressive training sequence that will help you learn the secrets to building a great defense.ÿDrills include:

    • 1v1 Facing an Attacker: Learn the three step process for shutting down attackers.
    • 1v1 Facing an Attacker's Back: Learn the key elements of how to quickly dispossess the ball from an attacker who receives it with their back to you.
    • 2v2: Learn the right spacing and movement so your players don't get split. ÿ
    • 4v4 Backline Walkthrough: Coach Clepper walks through the defensive responsibilities checklist.ÿThe series progresses into a live drill where the back four work together to stop the attack in various parts of the field. ÿ
    • 6v4: Learn how to defend and stifle the opponent's attack even when outnumbered. ÿ
    • 8v4: Learn how four defenders can keep eight players from scoring by being in the correct positions.ÿ

    The key coaching points in each drill include:

    • How to make adjustments as the ball moves across the field.
    • Keeping players organized and connected in order to stop through ball penetration.
    • How defensive spacing changes when you are defending a good dribbler.
    • The back four zonal shape and responsibilities when defending outside of the 18 yard box.
    • How to switch from zonal defending to man marking once the ball is inside the 18 yard box.

    Coach Clepper constantly emphasizes the principle of staying connected to eliminate through balls. ÿ

    On average, there are over 200 transitional moments during a game. It's important to master and take advantage of those moments to be successful, and this video will help you do just that!

    77 minutes. 2018.




    0 0

    with Alan Yost, Capital University Head Men's Soccer Coach;
    coached Capital to their first NCAA Tournament victory in school history (2017);
    NSCAA Premier Diploma holder (highest diploma offered through the NSCAA); associate staff coach for the NSCAA;

    In this video, Alan Yost works his team through a series of passing patterns, each of which incorporate a number of progressions. The session evolves into a number of small-sided games which add transitional play and build on the passing patterns that Coach Yost covers earlier in the video. Finally, Yost finishes by working on creating finishing opportunities through ball movement and transition play.

    Passing Patterns

    Through a series of three passing patterns, you will see how to maximize ball movement within your midfield shape. Yost runs his team through different options within each pattern while emphasizing the key points of:

    • Effective ball movement with the proper touch and pace on the ball.
    • Game-like verbal and visual communication.
    • Disguising passes with exaggerated feints and "selling the dummy."

    Small-Sided Games

    Yost gives you three small-sided games which build on the passing patterns and incorporate transition. You'll see how the elements of the passing patterns can help your team find success under pressure, as well as how changing game parameters can highlight specific coaching points.

    Finishing

    You'll see three finishing games which expand on the concepts taught within the passing patterns and small-sided games. Coach Yost emphasizes:

    • The creation of right and left options for the ball carrier.
    • Why attacking the defender's front foot will help athletes find success.
    • Being creative in the final third to create finishing opportunities.

    This video presents ideas that can help you design a complete practice. Every small-sided game incorporates transition play and continual play while providing plenty of touches for all players. Additionally, Coach Yost demonstrates three finishing drills (with several variations) to end the training session with fun, high-energy activities. This is a must-buy for any coach whose team could improve their ball movement and finishing skills!

    116 minutes. 2018.


    0 0

    with Alan Yost, Capital University Head Men's Soccer Coach;
    coached Capital to their first NCAA Tournament victory in school history (2017);
    NSCAA Premier Diploma holder (highest diploma offered through the NSCAA); associate staff coach for the NSCAA;

    Alan Yost and his Capital men's soccer team qualified for the NCAA Tournament in 2017 and became the first team in program history to win a game in the tournament. Yost's 5-3-2 defensive formation contributed to his team's success thanks to its ability to quickly take advantage of the counterattack.

    This video from Coach Yost will help you teach your players to be successful in the 5-3-2 through a series of drills and games that focus on the technical and tactical buildup of the formation. Yost includes play diagramming and game highlights to help illustrate each teaching point he makes. The 5-3-2 is especially effective at keeping the opponent out of your critical scoring areas while enabling an effective counterattack through transition to finish.

    Building the Defense

    Reinforce fundamental individual defense and build to team defensive roles through a series of four drills and progressions. Coach Yost explains and demonstrates:

    • Front and back hand defending; as well as front and back foot defending.
    • Defensive roles in small-sided situations.
    • How to make offensive play predictable and how to recognize when to jump in during vulnerable situations to create a counterattack.

    Ball Movement Through the Midfield

    Through a series of two possession-focused drills and progressions, you'll learn to teach your midfielders to disguise their passes to facilitate ball movement. Yost shows how to work on ball movement in a small area and how to apply the same principles on a larger scale within the 5-3-2.

    Finish the Counterattack

    Coach Yost teaches a finishing drill that will train your players how to be successful when provided attack opportunities within the 5-3-2. He'll help you understand how to shift the formation to support the attack and what the roles and positioning requirements are to finish the ball consistently.

    The 5-3-2, when implemented as taught by Coach Yost, can tighten up your defense and be an effective counterattack formation. This session teaches and demonstrates the player/position roles and responsibilities that will help your 5-3-2 dominate the competition!

    118 minutes. 2018.


    0 0

    Bobby Muuss,
    Wake Forest University Head Men's Soccer Coach;
    2016 NCAA College Cup Runner-up;
    3 straight appearances in the quarterfinals (2015-2017);
    Muuss' record in his first three years includes 55 wins - more than any other D I program in that same span.
    3x ACC Coach of the Year;
    former University of Denver Head Coach (2013 Summit League Coach of the Year);
    former Assistant Coach at UConn (2000 NCAA Champions, 3x Big East Champions)

    In this video, Bobby Muuss demonstrates how he teaches his players to press and the art of counter pressing the "Wake Forest Way." He provides in-depth illustrations both on a white board and on the field to show different key elements for your players.

    You'll learn how to train your team to press and how to quickly counter press to win the ball back as fast as you can. Muuss explains the teaching points he emphasizes during the exercises:

    • Reactions needed to win the ball back.
    • How to play proactive defense.
    • The importance of staying connected as a team to properly defend.

    Practice Segments

    Coach Muuss begins this session by having his players go through a warm-up. Within this warm-up, he addresses numerous aspects which include dynamic stretching, speed/agility/quickness, injury prevention, first touch technical work, and the foundation of individual defense with the use of mannequins.

    The second segment is "2v2v2+1." It's in this exercise that players must be aware of the defending team and how quick reactions are needed to make sure they're not on the wrong side of the ball when the game ends. This is where Muuss trains the habits needed to build his pressing game at Wake Forest. It also forces his players to play and make quick decisions in tight spaces.

    In the third activity, Coach Muuss shows a "7v3 Pressing Game." As with most of his games, players indirectly train multiple aspects of the game. Possession and pressing are key aspects that are covered in this game. Players are rewarded by not only keeping the ball, but counter pressing in small groups of three.

    The fourth game is a progression from the previous one, but Muuss adds additional numbers and larger goals to also work on finishing from close range. The teams are given specific roles to either keep possession or counter press and score within a given amount of time.

    The fifth and final game is 7v7+1. Muuss uses this game to reinforce what was taught during the session, but gives the teams additional points by winning the ball in the attacking half of the field to reinforce pressing and defending on the front foot.

    Coach Muuss shows you just how effective pressing can be and how Wake Forest has used it to their advantage, making them one of the best college teams in the nation.

    78 minutes + 28 bonus minutes. 2018.


    0 0

    Bobby Muuss,
    Wake Forest University Head Men's Soccer Coach;
    2016 NCAA College Cup Runner-up;
    3 straight appearances in the quarterfinals (2015-2017);
    Muuss' record in his first three years includes 55 wins - more than any other D I program in that same span.
    3x ACC Coach of the Year;
    former University of Denver Head Coach (2013 Summit League Coach of the Year);
    former Assistant Coach at UConn (2000 NCAA Champions, 3x Big East Champions)

    Bobby Muuss shows how he teaches his players the importance of playing off target players and the movement needed to attack quickly using the "Wake Forest Way." He provides in-depth illustrations both on a white board and on the field to show different key elements for your players.

    In this video, you'll learn how to train your team to play off target players. Coach Muuss explains the teaching points he emphasizes during the exercises:

    • Movement and supporting angles going forward that create the most danger.
    • Good reactions in transitional moments.
    • Positioning of players in advanced areas and how to bring players into the match.
    • Importance of finding a rhythm in the opponent's half of the field to find central areas.

    Practice Segments

    Muuss includes six exercises that he uses at Wake Forest. He begins this session by putting his players through a warm-up. Here, he shows how to incorporate dynamic stretching, technical passing and first touch, speed and quickness, and injury prevention all within the warm up.

    The second exercise that Coach Muuss shows is what he calls "6v6+4 Transfer Box." This game addresses attacking, defending, and his transitional style of play. It's during this game that players are put in an environment where they have two target players to find; the central midfielder and center striker. The players also have to play using the correct shape while making the right decisions to be able to play through pressure and tight spaces.

    In the third activity, Muuss shows how he builds from an unopposed to opposed game with a 3v0 to 3v3 transition game. Throughout the session, he teaches his players the different types of runs they can make to not only create space for themselves, but also gain the ability to combine and find third man runners. As he adds three additional players, Muuss continues to stress how important off the ball movement can be to rip apart even the most compact defenses.

    Next, Coach Muuss increases the amount of players to make a 5v5 transition game. Once the ball enters the field of play, he forces two players to have to recover from transition, giving the attacking team a numbers-up situation going to goal.

    After the 5v5 game, Coach Muuss makes the situation more complex by making it 9v8. An element added is the use of "Area 14," which is a key area for successful attacking teams. Through the design of the session, players now have to recognize which area is best to attack based on the defending team and how they recover.

    The sixth and final game is a 7v7+1 game with touch restrictions. Muuss uses this game to reinforce what was taught during the session and adds the touch restriction to continue to force his players to play at a high tempo.

    No matter what system you play, you will need to learn how to play off certain key players to penetrate and go forward with pace. Coach Muuss does an excellent job of creating the right environment to teach his players, and this video allows you to take his techniques and implement them yourself!

    73 minutes + 28 bonus minutes. 2018.


    0 0

    Bobby Muuss,
    Wake Forest University Head Men's Soccer Coach;
    2016 NCAA College Cup Runner-up;
    3 straight appearances in the quarterfinals (2015-2017);
    Muuss' record in his first three years includes 55 wins - more than any other D I program in that same span.
    3x ACC Coach of the Year;
    former University of Denver Head Coach (2013 Summit League Coach of the Year);
    former Assistant Coach at UConn (2000 NCAA Champions, 3x Big East Champions)

    Wake Forest University is one of the top men's soccer programs in the country. In this video, head coach Bobby Muuss gives a rare behind the scenes look into what has helped the Wake Forest soccer program achieve tremendous success.

    Coach Muuss demonstrates how he teaches his players the importance of possession to penetrate and the art of counter pressing the "Wake Forest Way." You'll see numerous progressions that will help your team be dangerous keeping the ball and allow them to quickly win it back. Muuss provides in-depth illustrations both on a white board and on the field to show different key elements for your players, including:

    • The movement and supporting angles needed from supporting players.
    • Reactions needed to win the ball back.
    • How to read the play and make the right decisions based on positioning.
    • The small details needed to be a technical attacking team.
    • The importance of scanning and checking your shoulder for better vision.

    Small Sided Games

    Coach Muuss begins by addressing the key technical elements needed for quick ball circulation, body position, and the ability to turn in a dynamic setting. You'll see three unopposed passing patterns that lay the foundation for his team's ability to play forward. The emphasis in these particular passing patterns is that the players develop a good sense of rhythm when passing while making sure the angles of support are correct. He progresses this by showing additional patterns to be able to attack and go forward.

    The second small sided game that Muuss shows is a 5v2 reaction game. It's here that he is able to cover the two main topics of the session, which are possession to penetrate using a third man and counter pressing. He trains his players to play using the correct shape and decision making to be able to play through pressure and tight spaces to find a central player. He also lays the foundation of getting into good habits of reaction when losing the ball.

    In the third game, which is 4v4+3, Muuss builds from his previous game into a more complex one with the same emphasis. He creates and shows a dynamic way of teaching the use of quick ball circulation and the ability to counter press when the right moment occurs. Throughout the small sided game, he continues to stress how important off the ball movement can be and how important it is to have good reactions in a competitive environment.

    The fourth small sided game is 7v0 to 7v5 Game. It's here that Coach Muuss builds his players in an unopposed environment while teaching them the playing style/philosophy he wants. These include three main objectives: ball circulation, wingers in, and positioning of the outside backs. Once the players are able to grasp the idea, he adds seven more players to the game.

    The fifth and final small sided game is a 7v7+1 game with touch restrictions. Muuss uses this game to reinforce what was taught during the session and adds the touch restriction to continue to force his players to play at a high tempo.

    Coach Muuss uses this video to show how he trains his teams to possess to penetrate and how to apply the counter press. Every coach must teach their team how to possess and play through the field, and this is one of the most in-depth resources to learn possession that you'll find!

    87 minutes + 28 bonus minutes. 2018.


    0 0
  • 10/16/18--22:00: Alan Yost 2-Pack
  • RD-05390A:

    with Alan Yost, Capital University Head Men's Soccer Coach;
    coached Capital to their first NCAA Tournament victory in school history (2017);
    NSCAA Premier Diploma holder (highest diploma offered through the NSCAA); associate staff coach for the NSCAA;

    Alan Yost and his Capital men's soccer team qualified for the NCAA Tournament in 2017 and became the first team in program history to win a game in the tournament. Yost's 5-3-2 defensive formation contributed to his team's success thanks to its ability to quickly take advantage of the counterattack.

    This video from Coach Yost will help you teach your players to be successful in the 5-3-2 through a series of drills and games that focus on the technical and tactical buildup of the formation. Yost includes play diagramming and game highlights to help illustrate each teaching point he makes. The 5-3-2 is especially effective at keeping the opponent out of your critical scoring areas while enabling an effective counterattack through transition to finish.

    Building the Defense

    Reinforce fundamental individual defense and build to team defensive roles through a series of four drills and progressions. Coach Yost explains and demonstrates:

    • Front and back hand defending; as well as front and back foot defending.
    • Defensive roles in small-sided situations.
    • How to make offensive play predictable and how to recognize when to jump in during vulnerable situations to create a counterattack.

    Ball Movement Through the Midfield

    Through a series of two possession-focused drills and progressions, you'll learn to teach your midfielders to disguise their passes to facilitate ball movement. Yost shows how to work on ball movement in a small area and how to apply the same principles on a larger scale within the 5-3-2.

    Finish the Counterattack

    Coach Yost teaches a finishing drill that will train your players how to be successful when provided attack opportunities within the 5-3-2. He'll help you understand how to shift the formation to support the attack and what the roles and positioning requirements are to finish the ball consistently.

    The 5-3-2, when implemented as taught by Coach Yost, can tighten up your defense and be an effective counterattack formation. This session teaches and demonstrates the player/position roles and responsibilities that will help your 5-3-2 dominate the competition!

    118 minutes. 2018.



    RD-05390B:

    with Alan Yost, Capital University Head Men's Soccer Coach;
    coached Capital to their first NCAA Tournament victory in school history (2017);
    NSCAA Premier Diploma holder (highest diploma offered through the NSCAA); associate staff coach for the NSCAA;

    In this video, Alan Yost works his team through a series of passing patterns, each of which incorporate a number of progressions. The session evolves into a number of small-sided games which add transitional play and build on the passing patterns that Coach Yost covers earlier in the video. Finally, Yost finishes by working on creating finishing opportunities through ball movement and transition play.

    Passing Patterns

    Through a series of three passing patterns, you will see how to maximize ball movement within your midfield shape. Yost runs his team through different options within each pattern while emphasizing the key points of:

    • Effective ball movement with the proper touch and pace on the ball.
    • Game-like verbal and visual communication.
    • Disguising passes with exaggerated feints and "selling the dummy."

    Small-Sided Games

    Yost gives you three small-sided games which build on the passing patterns and incorporate transition. You'll see how the elements of the passing patterns can help your team find success under pressure, as well as how changing game parameters can highlight specific coaching points.

    Finishing

    You'll see three finishing games which expand on the concepts taught within the passing patterns and small-sided games. Coach Yost emphasizes:

    • The creation of right and left options for the ball carrier.
    • Why attacking the defender's front foot will help athletes find success.
    • Being creative in the final third to create finishing opportunities.

    This video presents ideas that can help you design a complete practice. Every small-sided game incorporates transition play and continual play while providing plenty of touches for all players. Additionally, Coach Yost demonstrates three finishing drills (with several variations) to end the training session with fun, high-energy activities. This is a must-buy for any coach whose team could improve their ball movement and finishing skills!

    116 minutes. 2018.




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    RD-05383A:

    Bobby Muuss,
    Wake Forest University Head Men's Soccer Coach;
    2016 NCAA College Cup Runner-up;
    3 straight appearances in the quarterfinals (2015-2017);
    Muuss' record in his first three years includes 55 wins - more than any other D I program in that same span.
    3x ACC Coach of the Year;
    former University of Denver Head Coach (2013 Summit League Coach of the Year);
    former Assistant Coach at UConn (2000 NCAA Champions, 3x Big East Champions)

    In this video, Bobby Muuss demonstrates how he teaches his players to press and the art of counter pressing the "Wake Forest Way." He provides in-depth illustrations both on a white board and on the field to show different key elements for your players.

    You'll learn how to train your team to press and how to quickly counter press to win the ball back as fast as you can. Muuss explains the teaching points he emphasizes during the exercises:

    • Reactions needed to win the ball back.
    • How to play proactive defense.
    • The importance of staying connected as a team to properly defend.

    Practice Segments

    Coach Muuss begins this session by having his players go through a warm-up. Within this warm-up, he addresses numerous aspects which include dynamic stretching, speed/agility/quickness, injury prevention, first touch technical work, and the foundation of individual defense with the use of mannequins.

    The second segment is "2v2v2+1." It's in this exercise that players must be aware of the defending team and how quick reactions are needed to make sure they're not on the wrong side of the ball when the game ends. This is where Muuss trains the habits needed to build his pressing game at Wake Forest. It also forces his players to play and make quick decisions in tight spaces.

    In the third activity, Coach Muuss shows a "7v3 Pressing Game." As with most of his games, players indirectly train multiple aspects of the game. Possession and pressing are key aspects that are covered in this game. Players are rewarded by not only keeping the ball, but counter pressing in small groups of three.

    The fourth game is a progression from the previous one, but Muuss adds additional numbers and larger goals to also work on finishing from close range. The teams are given specific roles to either keep possession or counter press and score within a given amount of time.

    The fifth and final game is 7v7+1. Muuss uses this game to reinforce what was taught during the session, but gives the teams additional points by winning the ball in the attacking half of the field to reinforce pressing and defending on the front foot.

    Coach Muuss shows you just how effective pressing can be and how Wake Forest has used it to their advantage, making them one of the best college teams in the nation.

    78 minutes + 28 bonus minutes. 2018.



    RD-05383B:

    Bobby Muuss,
    Wake Forest University Head Men's Soccer Coach;
    2016 NCAA College Cup Runner-up;
    3 straight appearances in the quarterfinals (2015-2017);
    Muuss' record in his first three years includes 55 wins - more than any other D I program in that same span.
    3x ACC Coach of the Year;
    former University of Denver Head Coach (2013 Summit League Coach of the Year);
    former Assistant Coach at UConn (2000 NCAA Champions, 3x Big East Champions)

    Bobby Muuss shows how he teaches his players the importance of playing off target players and the movement needed to attack quickly using the "Wake Forest Way." He provides in-depth illustrations both on a white board and on the field to show different key elements for your players.

    In this video, you'll learn how to train your team to play off target players. Coach Muuss explains the teaching points he emphasizes during the exercises:

    • Movement and supporting angles going forward that create the most danger.
    • Good reactions in transitional moments.
    • Positioning of players in advanced areas and how to bring players into the match.
    • Importance of finding a rhythm in the opponent's half of the field to find central areas.

    Practice Segments

    Muuss includes six exercises that he uses at Wake Forest. He begins this session by putting his players through a warm-up. Here, he shows how to incorporate dynamic stretching, technical passing and first touch, speed and quickness, and injury prevention all within the warm up.

    The second exercise that Coach Muuss shows is what he calls "6v6+4 Transfer Box." This game addresses attacking, defending, and his transitional style of play. It's during this game that players are put in an environment where they have two target players to find; the central midfielder and center striker. The players also have to play using the correct shape while making the right decisions to be able to play through pressure and tight spaces.

    In the third activity, Muuss shows how he builds from an unopposed to opposed game with a 3v0 to 3v3 transition game. Throughout the session, he teaches his players the different types of runs they can make to not only create space for themselves, but also gain the ability to combine and find third man runners. As he adds three additional players, Muuss continues to stress how important off the ball movement can be to rip apart even the most compact defenses.

    Next, Coach Muuss increases the amount of players to make a 5v5 transition game. Once the ball enters the field of play, he forces two players to have to recover from transition, giving the attacking team a numbers-up situation going to goal.

    After the 5v5 game, Coach Muuss makes the situation more complex by making it 9v8. An element added is the use of "Area 14," which is a key area for successful attacking teams. Through the design of the session, players now have to recognize which area is best to attack based on the defending team and how they recover.

    The sixth and final game is a 7v7+1 game with touch restrictions. Muuss uses this game to reinforce what was taught during the session and adds the touch restriction to continue to force his players to play at a high tempo.

    No matter what system you play, you will need to learn how to play off certain key players to penetrate and go forward with pace. Coach Muuss does an excellent job of creating the right environment to teach his players, and this video allows you to take his techniques and implement them yourself!

    73 minutes + 28 bonus minutes. 2018.



    RD-05383C:

    Bobby Muuss,
    Wake Forest University Head Men's Soccer Coach;
    2016 NCAA College Cup Runner-up;
    3 straight appearances in the quarterfinals (2015-2017);
    Muuss' record in his first three years includes 55 wins - more than any other D I program in that same span.
    3x ACC Coach of the Year;
    former University of Denver Head Coach (2013 Summit League Coach of the Year);
    former Assistant Coach at UConn (2000 NCAA Champions, 3x Big East Champions)

    Wake Forest University is one of the top men's soccer programs in the country. In this video, head coach Bobby Muuss gives a rare behind the scenes look into what has helped the Wake Forest soccer program achieve tremendous success.

    Coach Muuss demonstrates how he teaches his players the importance of possession to penetrate and the art of counter pressing the "Wake Forest Way." You'll see numerous progressions that will help your team be dangerous keeping the ball and allow them to quickly win it back. Muuss provides in-depth illustrations both on a white board and on the field to show different key elements for your players, including:

    • The movement and supporting angles needed from supporting players.
    • Reactions needed to win the ball back.
    • How to read the play and make the right decisions based on positioning.
    • The small details needed to be a technical attacking team.
    • The importance of scanning and checking your shoulder for better vision.

    Small Sided Games

    Coach Muuss begins by addressing the key technical elements needed for quick ball circulation, body position, and the ability to turn in a dynamic setting. You'll see three unopposed passing patterns that lay the foundation for his team's ability to play forward. The emphasis in these particular passing patterns is that the players develop a good sense of rhythm when passing while making sure the angles of support are correct. He progresses this by showing additional patterns to be able to attack and go forward.

    The second small sided game that Muuss shows is a 5v2 reaction game. It's here that he is able to cover the two main topics of the session, which are possession to penetrate using a third man and counter pressing. He trains his players to play using the correct shape and decision making to be able to play through pressure and tight spaces to find a central player. He also lays the foundation of getting into good habits of reaction when losing the ball.

    In the third game, which is 4v4+3, Muuss builds from his previous game into a more complex one with the same emphasis. He creates and shows a dynamic way of teaching the use of quick ball circulation and the ability to counter press when the right moment occurs. Throughout the small sided game, he continues to stress how important off the ball movement can be and how important it is to have good reactions in a competitive environment.

    The fourth small sided game is 7v0 to 7v5 Game. It's here that Coach Muuss builds his players in an unopposed environment while teaching them the playing style/philosophy he wants. These include three main objectives: ball circulation, wingers in, and positioning of the outside backs. Once the players are able to grasp the idea, he adds seven more players to the game.

    The fifth and final small sided game is a 7v7+1 game with touch restrictions. Muuss uses this game to reinforce what was taught during the session and adds the touch restriction to continue to force his players to play at a high tempo.

    Coach Muuss uses this video to show how he trains his teams to possess to penetrate and how to apply the counter press. Every coach must teach their team how to possess and play through the field, and this is one of the most in-depth resources to learn possession that you'll find!

    87 minutes + 28 bonus minutes. 2018.




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